Westminster Media Forum

We are continuing to organise full-scale virtual conferences which retain all the features of physical seminars, including full programmes, presentations with slides, panel discussions and live delegate questions and comments sessions, person-to-person and group networking, and a permanent record provided to all delegates afterwards. New events are coming on to our conference programme all the time, so there are plenty of opportunities to join us if you haven’t already, from wherever you are.
For booking-related queries or information on speaking please email us at info@forumsupport.co.uk, or contact us using one of the following numbers: +44 (0)7538736244 / +44 (0)7503591880 / +44 (0)7951044809.

If you’re already booked on, joining instructions can be accessed from five working days before your conference via the booking dashboard. Need help? Contact us at delegate.relations@forumsupport.co.uk

Valuing culture and heritage capital - research, evidence and investment decisions, public engagement, and priorities for sector innovation and collaboration

Morning, Monday, 23rd August 2021


***Full-scale policy conference taking place online***

This conference will discuss priorities and next steps for measuring the value of culture and heritage capital in the UK.


It will be an opportunity to examine the Government’s Valuing Culture and Heritage Capital initiative - and its potentially significant implications for the UK arts sector, cultural attractions and institutions, education, and local authorities, the workforce and the public.


The discussion will draw on findings in the Valuing Culture and Heritage Capital: A Framework Towards Informing Decision Making report, launched to kickstart development of a framework to enable a formal approach to the valuation of culture and heritage assets, and to support an evidence-based approach to future decision making.


We are pleased to include a pre-recorded contribution from Lord Mendoza, Commissioner for Cultural Recovery and Renewal and Provost of Oriel College, Oxford University.


There will be live keynote sessions with two of the authors of the Valuing Culture and Heritage Capital report, Harman Sagger, Head Economist for Arts, Heritage and Tourism and Lead, Culture and Heritage Capital Programme, DCMS and Jack Philips, Economic Advisor and Lead, Culture and Heritage Capital Programme, DCMS.


A further keynote speaker is Alan Law, Deputy Chief Executive, Natural England, on what can learned from the approach to measuring the economic value of natural capital when determining policy on ecosystem protection.


The agenda will bring out latest thinking on:

  • practicalities, processes and outcomes - challenges of measuring culture and heritage value across a diverse sector, the role in decisions on spending and wider policy, and how to evaluate outcomes
  • priorities and impact - strategies for building stakeholder and public engagement, promoting inclusion and accessibility, and driving local economic growth
  • best practice - learning from the use of studies in other sectors, such as the recent Dasgupta Economics of Biodiversity Review, and from the processes of informing policy and budget decisions
  • the tools for decision-making - developing the research base behind the UK’s creative economy, strategies for collaboration, priorities for support, and what is needed from innovation in technology

The conference will be an opportunity for stakeholders to consider the issues alongside key policy officials who are due to attend from DCMS; the Cabinet Office; the CCC; DAERA, NI; the Department for Education; and the Welsh Government.


The agenda:

  • Priorities for developing a Culture and Heritage Capital approach to measuring value
  • The Culture and Heritage Capital Programme and its future work
  • What more can be done to effectively engage with the public and demonstrate public benefit and impact?
  • Stakeholder perspectives on priorities for developing an evidence-based approach to measuring the value of culture and heritage to inform future investment decisions
  • Learning from the natural capital approach to measuring value
  • Priorities for research on economic valuation of culture and heritage
  • Driving innovation and improving collaboration in the sector - building R&D partnerships, supporting evidence-based policymaking and securing value for money in publicly funded arts and heritage organisations

Key areas for discussion:

Developing an evidence-based approach - latest thinking on the practicalities of measuring the value of culture and heritage, including:

  • scope, form, and purpose:
    • what does a culture and heritage capital approach look like
    • what should its role be in informing future guidance, particularly in the Green Book produced by HM Treasury for appraising policies, programmes, and projects across Government
  • challenges and outcomes - strategies for:
    • measuring the value of assets effectively across a disparate sector
    • being able to realise the social and economic value of culture and heritage
  • building engagement - whether more needs to be done to:
    • effectively involve the public and increase community engagement with heritage assets
    • demonstrate public benefit and impact as part of any measurement
  • diversity and inclusion - how best to ensure that measures designed to promote inclusion and accessibility, and strengthen local identity are included in any framework
  • driving local economic growth - the role of developing a culture and heritage capital approach, supporting the sector’s short-term recovery, and long-term sustainability
  • funding and investment - the future outlook for the financing of UK culture and heritage, and the possible impact of a clearer measurement of value on private investment in the sector

Best practice and learning from other sectors:

  • the natural capital approach - what can be learnt from exercises such as the recent Dasgupta Economics of Biodiversity Review for measuring the value of culture for society and the economy
  • impact on decision-making - how should guidance itself be assessed, and the processes of informing decision making across government, as well as future investment and budget measures

Developing the research base behind the UK’s creative economy:

  • developing decision-making tools - priorities for supporting the creative sector to enable informed decisions about value, support evidence-based policymaking, and deliver value for money
  • priorities for collaboration - next steps for building R&D partnerships and joint working, improving cross-sector knowledge exchange, and linking with the UK Research and Development Roadmap
  • tech and innovation - what is needed from emerging technologies to enable the sector to adapt to post-pandemic changes in behaviour, realise value, maximise impact, and attract new audiences
  • priorities for support - where should funding and resources be directed to develop talent, and growing the knowledge base to support growth in the sector

Background to the discussion:

  • Valuing Culture and Heritage Capital: A Framework Towards Informing Decision Making - the Government report on developing a formal approach to evaluating the benefit of culture and heritage to society, and support an evidence-based approach to decision making
  • the Rapid Evidence Assessment: Culture and Heritage Valuation Studies framework - DCMS’s assessment of the current state of the literature valuing the services provided by culture and heritage assets
  • the Creative Industries Policy and Evidence Centre (PEC) - the ongoing work of the centre, led by Nesta, which is aimed at supporting independent research to aid the development of policies that support the UK's creative industries
  • the Natural Capital approach - referenced as an example of what the Government are looking to achieve in the Valuing Culture and Heritage Capital framework, whereby the consideration of the value of the natural environment for people and the economy would be included as a factor in any decision making
  • the UK Research and Development Roadmap - aimed at supporting the development of science and research that will deliver economic growth and societal benefits across the UK, and identify the key challenges and issues facing the sector going forward
  • Search for the next UK City of Culture launched - DCMS announcing the competition will find the city who to take over from Coventry, which is currently the UK City of Culture 2021
  • Government support during the pandemic - including the £1.57bn Culture Recovery Fund and the Culture Recovery Board, the Film and TV Production Restart Scheme, as well as wider measures, such as the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme

Policy officials attending:

Our forums are known for attracting strong interest from policymakers and stakeholders. Places have been reserved by officials from the Cabinet Office; the Climate Change Committee; DAERA, NI; the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport; the Department for Education; and the Welsh Government.


Overall, we expect speakers and attendees to be a senior and informed group including Members of both Houses of Parliament, senior government and regulatory officials involved in this area of policy, as well as from museums and heritage sites, galleries and arts centres, theatre companies, venues and hospitality groups, orchestras, dance and performance troupes, broadcasters, production companies, music publishers, artist collectives, education and training platforms, copyright and intellectual property lawyers, funding bodies and charities, local government, as well as researchers in academia and higher education, together with reporters from the national and specialist media.


This is a full-scale conference taking place online***

  • full, four-hour programme including comfort breaks - you’ll also get a full recording and transcript to refer back to
  • information-rich discussion involving key policymakers and stakeholders
  • conference materials provided in advance, including speaker biographies
  • speakers presenting via webcam, accompanied by slides if they wish, using the Cisco WebEx professional online conference platform (easy for delegates - we’ll provide full details)
  • opportunities for live delegate questions and comments with all speakers
  • a recording of the addresses, all slides cleared by speakers, and further materials, is made available to all delegates afterwards as a permanent record of the proceedings
  • delegates are able to add their own written comments and articles following the conference, to be distributed to all attendees and more widely
  • too - there will be opportunities for delegates to e-meet and interact - we’ll tell you how!

Full information and guidance on how to take part will be sent to delegates before the conference



Keynote Speaker

Alan Law

Deputy Chief Executive, Natural England

Keynote Speakers

Hasan Bakhshi

Centre Director, Creative Industries Policy and Evidence Centre and Executive Director, Creative Economy and Data Analytics, Nesta

Lord Mendoza

Commissioner for Cultural Recovery and Renewal and Provost of Oriel College, Oxford University (pre-recorded presentation)

Fiona Tuck

Associate Director, Metro Dynamics

Alan Law

Deputy Chief Executive, Natural England

Speakers

Stephen Stenning

Head of Arts and Society, British Council

Kate Mavor

Chief Executive, English Heritage

Jack Philips

Economic Advisor and Lead, Culture and Heritage Capital Programme, DCMS

Harman Sagger

Head Economist for Arts, Heritage and Tourism and Lead, Culture and Heritage Capital Programme, DCMS

Professor David Throsby

Professor of Economics, Macquarie University, Sydney

Professor Christopher Smith

Executive Chair, AHRC, and International Champion, UKRI

Professor Christopher Smith, Executive Chair, AHRC, and International Champion, UKRI

Executive Chair, AHRC, and International Champion, UKRI